Weed Walk

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I participated in an outdoor seminar offered by The Master Herbalist. We hiked around a park while he pointed out native Minnesotan plants that have some herbal uses. He called it a “Wild Plant Walk’, but I think “Weed Walk” pretty much summed it up.

Here are a few of the weeds, I mean wild plants, we learned about.

Disclaimer: Some parts of some of these plants are edible, some parts are medicinal, and some parts are poisonous! As a beginning student of herbalism, I will not assume any liability if you eat, drink or smoke these wild plants or any others. If you want to forage for wild plants, get expert help beforehand!

Wild bergamot

Wild bergamot is a member of the mint family, and has a scent like oregano. It was used by some Native American tribes to scent sweat lodge fires, and by others to flavor meat.

Wild grape vines and wild rose

Only a small percentage of wild grape vines actually produce fruit, but the tendrils of the grape vine are also edible.

Rose hips are edible, too, but you eat the skin only, not the inner part.

Pleurisy root and alien seed pods

Pleurisy root is used to help heal respiratory infections, pneumonia, and pleurisy.

Those seed pods are freaky. Don’t they look like little aliens could burst out of them at any minute? I don’t remember what they’re called, but I suggest you stay away from them.

The Master Herbalist, the other students, and I walked around the park looking at, sniffing, touching and photographing weeds for almost two hours. By that time, dusk was falling and the bugs were attacking us with a vengeance, in spite of the natural bug spray provided by The Master H.

The Master H.  warned us, if we had cats, to shower right when we got home. The bug spray was made of catnip and other essential oils. Indeed, Bella Cat went insane when I got home and attacked me in a most vicious and unladylike manner! First the kamikaze mosquitoes, and then the catnip crazed feline.

Ahh, it was so nice to shower off the sunscreen, the catnip, the sweat and the pollen of the day. Pure bliss.

Stay tuned…

Repeat Disclaimer, just to be sure: Some parts of some of these plants are edible, some parts are medicinal, and some parts are poisonous! As a beginning student of herbalism, I will not assume any liability if you eat, drink or smoke these wild plants or any others. If you want to forage for wild plants, get expert help beforehand!

 

Mistress Herbalist, or 278

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I know finishing my herbalist certification was not on my list of goals this year, but the school I’ve been doing my study-from-home-at-your-own-pace course just offered an in-person add-on. That is, the Master Herbalist will teach the course 2 nights a week, and I’ll be done in 6 months.

I asked the tarot cards (woo-woo alert) what to do and they said SIGN UP FOR THE CLASS!!! So I did.

Unfortunately, there weren’t enough students to hold the class, so it was canceled. I decided that I must get back into the home study and do it on my own. I studied and e-mailed in homework 2 nights last week. After 5 years, that brings me up to lesson #12 (out of around 60).

That means I averaged 2 lessons per year, before last week. Do you think I can finish the rest of the course in 6 months to become a Mistress Herbalist?

After I finished my homework, I worked on the art studio. I picked the stack closest to the door and (almost) cleared it.

I threw away 1 box of stuff, took one box to the Goodwill, and filled a bag with recycling. That brings my bag count to 278.

studio stack

I even vacuumed the newly exposed patch of carpet.

Stay tuned…

p.s. My bag count being 278 means that I’ve removed 278 bags, boxes and small pieces of furniture from my house since January, 2014.